Millennial’s Top 10 Housing Markets

WASHINGTON (June 4, 2020) – The National Association of Realtors® identified 10 markets with favorable conditions for millennial homebuyers during the coronavirus pandemic. In alphabetical order, the markets are:

  • Austin-Round Rock, Texas
  • Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas
  • Des Moines-West Des Moines, Iowa
  • Durham-Chapel Hill-Raleigh, North Carolina
  • Houston-The Woodlands, Texas
  • Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Indiana
  • Omaha, Nebraska/Council Bluffs, Iowa
  • Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Arizona
  • Portland, Oregon/Vancouver, Washington
  • Salt Lake City, Utah

“Record-low mortgage rates have improved housing affordability, bringing more buyers into the market, and multiple offers for starter homes could become common in these metro areas,” said NAR’s Chief Economist Lawrence Yun. “With relatively better employment conditions and a strong presence of millennials in these markets, more new home construction will be required to fully satisfy the housing demand as the economy reopens.”

NAR identified the top 10 metro areas for millennial homebuyers by analyzing current housing affordability, local job market conditions during the coronavirus pandemic, the share of millennials in the area and inventory availability in the largest 100 metropolitan statistical areas across the country.

“Nationally, millennials make up the largest share of homebuyers and these metropolitan areas, in particular, offer great opportunities to realize the dream of homeownership,” said NAR President Vince Malta, broker at Malta & Co., Inc., in San Francisco, CA. “As states and cities begin to reopen, millennials will play a significant role in the housing market’s recovery.”

Nationwide, the typical household can afford to buy 40% of the homes currently listed for sale compared to 34% a year earlier, according to the Realtors® Affordability Distribution Score, a collaboration between the National Association of Realtors® and realtor.com®. The score measures the affordability of current for-sale homes overall as well as at different income levels. In these top 10 markets, affordability increased more this year than it did nationwide. For example, a household earning $100,000 in Dallas can afford to buy 56% of homes currently listed for sale compared to 45% last year.

According to April 2020 employment data, employment declined by an average of nearly 13% in the largest 100 metro areas compared to last year. However, in Dallas, Houston, Salt Lake City and Phoenix, employment dropped 8% from a year earlier.

The 10 markets listed had a smaller share of workers, on average, in industries most affected by the pandemic-induced economic lockdown. For example, in Durham and Des Moines, 15% and 17% of employees, respectively, work in industries at high risk from coronavirus. The average for the largest 100 metropolitan areas is 21%.

Another common factor among these markets is better-than-average inventory availability. For Des Moines and Omaha, the number of active listings in April 2020 increased by 5% and 1%, respectively, according to realtor.com®. However, inventory declined 18% on average in the largest 100 metro areas.

Three in 10 residents in these markets – 30% – are millennials. With millennials making up the largest cohort of homebuyers, these areas are expected to see many of their millennial residents become homeowners.

To view NAR’s Top 10 Most Favorable Areas for Millennials During the Pandemic report, visit https://www.nar.realtor/research-and-statistics/research-reports/top-10-most-favorable-areas-for-millennials-during-the-pandemic.

June is National Homeownership Month and NAR encourages current and future homeowners to visit https://homeownershipmatters.realtor/ or search #CreatingHome to learn more about the benefits of owning a home as well as policies and programs that promote homeownership.

The National Association of Realtors® is America’s largest trade association, representing more than 1.4 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

credit: National Association of Realtors

How to Retrofit a Home for an Earthquake

This Old House – Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House host Kevin O’Connor travels to Portland, Oregon to learn how to protect homes from earthquakes.

Steps:

  1. The work involved with a seismic retrofit often requires a consultation with an engineer, and any work involving gas must be done by a licensed professional. Consulting with a person who is licensed to do seismic retrofits can help identify key areas to work with in order to minimize damage.
  2. The house can be secured to the foundation by securing metal L brackets into the rim joist and the sill plate at locations determined by the engineer with a palm nailer and 10 penny nails.
  3. To connect the sill plate to the foundation, drill screw anchors into the anchor plates and the foundation, and wood screws through the anchor plates to the sill plate. Predrill the sill plate to prevent it from splitting.
  4. To prevent gas from leaking into the house during an earthquake, an automatic gas shut off valve can be installed by a licensed gas fitter.
  5. Shut off the gas to the meter.
  6. Disconnect the gas pipes starting from the meter until you reach a level gas pipe.
  7. Thread the gas shut off valve into the pipes using pipe dope and nipples.
  8. Reconnect the remaining gas pipes to the meter and turn the gas back on. Check for any leaks in the new gas work.
  9. Secure any valuables and nick knacks to the wall, shelves, and floor using museum putty and zip ties.
  10. Secure the water heater to the surrounding walls using straps.

Resources:
While the specialty hardware that was used to secure the house to the foundation can be found at most home centers, determining the proper location for that hardware may require a consultation with an engineer.

The seismic gas shutoff valve installed was a Northridge Valve, which is manufactured by Seismic Safety Products (http://www.seismic-safety.com/). Gas work is extremely dangerous and should always be left to licensed professionals.

The museum putty used to secure valuables to the shelves is manufactured by QuakeHOLD (http://www.quakehold.com/emergency-ma…).

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The Tech Giants are Coming for Our Homes

The Future of Our Connected Home, and How Big Tech will be Involved

The likes of Amazon, Google, Samsung, Apple and others are all competing for smart home dominance – but what drove so many of us to invite these multinational corporations into the highly personal spaces where we live?

In a world that is more connected than ever before, millions of us have welcomed leading technology giants into our properties for entertainment, to adjust the heating and even answer the door. 

Now a major market in its own right, the likes of Amazon, Google, Samsung, Apple and others are all competing for smart home dominance.

But why do these businesses care so much about where we live? Why are they developing such useful systems? What does this new world mean for our built environment? And what drove so many of us to invite these multinational corporations into the highly personal spaces we call home?

Credits: The B1M, Google, Amazon, Samsung, Apple, Philips, iRobot, Sonos, Honeywell, Ford, Behance, Facebook, Sidewalk Labs, Daikin and Ring.

First Time Home Buyers – Smart Tips

First-Time Homebuyer – Smart Tips

Buying your first home comes with many big decisions and can be as scary as it is exciting. It’s easy to get swept up in the whirlwind of home shopping and make mistakes that could leave you with buyer’s remorse later.

If this is your first rodeo as a homebuyer or it’s been many years since you last bought a home, knowledge is power. Here are the 14 most common mistakes first-time buyers make — and how to steer clear of these missteps.

1. Get Pre-Approved Before You Begin Looking for a Home

Many first-time buyers make the mistake of viewing homes before ever meeting with a mortgage lender. This puts you behind the ball if a home hits the market you love, or you look at homes that you can’t afford.

In some large markets, housing inventory is still tight and competition is fierce. You might find yourself willing to stretch your budget to buy a property or lose a property because you aren’t preapproved for a mortgage, says Alfredo Arteaga, a loan officer with Movement Mortgage in Mission Viejo, California.

What to do instead: “Before you fall in love with that gorgeous dream house you’ve been eyeing, be sure to get a fully underwritten preapproval,” Arteaga says. Being preapproved sends the message that you’re a serious buyer whose credit and finances pass muster to successfully get a loan.

2. Shop Around with Different Lenders for Loan

This one is a biggie. First-time buyers might get a mortgage from the first (and only) lender or bank they talk to, potentially leaving thousands of dollars on the table. The more you shop around, the better basis for comparison you’ll have to ensure you’re getting a good deal.

“A good mortgage loan officer can look at your situation and diagnose any potential roadblocks ahead to give you a clear understanding of your home-buying options,” Arteaga says.

What to do instead: Shop around with at least three different lenders, as well as a mortgage broker. Compare rates, lender fees and loan terms. Don’t discount customer service and lender responsiveness; both play key roles in making the mortgage approval process run smoothly.

3. Buy Only Enough House That You Can Reasonably Afford

It’s easy to fall in love with homes that might stretch your budget, but overextending yourself can lead to regret and worse later. It can put you at higher risk of losing your home if you fall on tough financial times.

What to do instead: Focus on what monthly payment you can afford rather than fixating on the maximum loan amount you qualify for. Just because you can qualify for a $300,000 loan, that doesn’t mean you can afford the monthly payments that come with it. Factor in your other obligations that don’t show on a credit report when determining how much house you can afford.

4. Take Your Time Don’t Rush Things

Buying a home can be complex, particularly when you get into the weeds of the mortgage process. Rushing the process can cost you later on, says Nick Bush, a Realtor with TowerHill Realty in Rockville, Maryland.

“The biggest mistake that I see [first-time buyers make] is to not plan far enough ahead for their purchase,” Bush says. “This doesn’t allow them to save (for a down payment and closing costs), fix items on their credit report, and debunk some of the myths about the process with a realtor and lender.”

What to do instead: Map out your home-buying timeline at least a year in advance. Keep in mind it can take months — even years — to repair poor credit and save enough for a sizable down payment. Work on boosting your credit score, paying down debt and saving more money to put you in a stronger position to get preapproved.

5. Hold Some Savings in Reserve

Spending all or most of their savings on the down payment and closing costs is one of the biggest mistakes first-time homebuyers make, says Ed Conarchy, a mortgage planner and investment adviser at Cherry Creek Mortgage in Gurnee, Illinois.

“Some people scrape all their money together to make the 20 percent down payment so they don’t have to pay for mortgage insurance, but they are picking the wrong poison because they are left with no savings at all,” Conarchy says.

Homebuyers who put 20 percent or more down don’t have to pay for mortgage insurance when getting a conventional mortgage. That’s usually translated into substantial savings on the monthly mortgage payment. But it’s not worth the risk of living on the edge, Conarchy says.

What to do instead: Aim to have three to six months of living expenses in an emergency fund. Paying mortgage insurance isn’t ideal, but depleting your emergency or retirement savings to make a large down payment is riskier.

6. Be Mindful of Your Credit

Lenders pull credit reports at preapproval to make sure things check out and again just before closing. They want to make sure nothing has changed in your financial picture. Any new loans or credit card accounts on your credit report can jeopardize the closing. Buyers, especially first-timers, often learn this lesson the hard way.

The goal: keep the status quo in your finances from preapproval to closing. Otherwise, you could lower your credit score, run up your debt-to-income ratio and imperil your final loan approval.

What to do instead: Don’t open new credit cards, close existing accounts, take out new loans or make large purchases on existing credit accounts in the months leading up to applying for a mortgage through closing day. Pay down your existing balances to below 30 percent of your available credit limit, and pay your bills on time and in full every month.

7. Be Flexible with Home Style and Design, Focus on Location

Sure, you want a home that checks off the items on your wish list and meets your needs. Being nitpicky about a home’s cosmetics, however, can be short-sighted if you wind up in a neighborhood you hate, says Alison Bernstein, president and founder of Suburban Jungle, a real estate strategy firm.

“Selecting the right town is critical to your life and family development,” Bernstein says. “The goal is to find you and your brood a place where the culture and values of the (area) match yours. You can always trade up or down for a new home; add a third bathroom or renovate a basement.”

What to do instead: Ask your real estate agent to help you track down neighborhood crime stats and school ratings. Measure the drive from the neighborhood to your job to gauge commuting time and proximity to public transportation. Visit the neighborhood at different times to get a sense of traffic, neighbor interactions and the overall vibe to see if it’s an area that appeals to you.

8. Try to Be Objective in the Decision Process

Buying a house is a major life milestone. It’s a place where you’ll make memories, create a space that’s truly yours, and put down roots. It’s easy to get too attached and make emotional decisions, so remember that you’re also making one of the largest investments of your life, says Ralph DiBugnara, president of Home Qualified in New York City.

“With this being a strong seller’s market, a lot of first-time buyers are bidding over what they are comfortable with because it is taking them longer than usual to find homes,” DiBugnara says.

What to do instead: “Have a budget and stick to it,” DiBugnara says. “Don’t become emotionally attached to a home that is not yours.”

9. You Do NOT Need 20 Percent Down Payment

The long-held belief that you must put 20 percent down payment is a myth. While a 20 percent down payment does help you avoid paying private mortgage insurance, many buyers today don’t want (or can’t) put down that much money. In fact, the median down payment on a home is 13 percent, according to the National Association of Realtors.

Delaying your home purchase to save up 20 percent could take years, and you could limit cash flow that could be put to better use maximizing your retirement savings, adding to your emergency fund or paying down high-interest debt.

What to consider instead: You can put as little as 3 percent down for a conventional mortgage (note: you’ll pay mortgage insurance). Some government-insured loans require 3.5 percent down or zero down, in some cases. Plus, check with your local or state housing programs to see if you qualify for housing assistance programs designed for first-time buyers.

10. Be Realistic with You’re Wants, Don’t Wait for That ‘unicorn’

Unicorns do not exist in real estate, and finding a perfect property is like finding a needle in a haystack. Looking for perfection can narrow your choices too much, and you might pass over solid contenders in the hopes that something better will come along. But this type of thinking can sabotage your search, says James D’Astice, a real estate agent with Compass in Chicago.

What to do instead: Keep an open mind about what’s on the market and be willing to put in some sweat equity, DiBugnara says. Some loan programs let you roll the cost of repairs into your mortgage, too, he adds.

11. Check out All Financing Options; FHA, VA and USDA Loans

First-time buyers might be cash-strapped in this environment of rising home prices and higher mortgage rates. As a result, it can be harder for them to qualify for a conventional loan and they might assume they have no financing options. That’s where government-insured loans enter the picture.

What to do instead: Look into one of the three government-insured loan programs backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA loans), U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA loans) and U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA loans). Here’s a brief overview of each:

FHA loans require just 3.5 percent down with a minimum 580 credit score. FHA loans can fill the gap for borrowers who don’t have top-notch credit or little money saved up. The major drawback to these loans, though, is mandatory mortgage insurance, paid both annually and upfront at closing.

VA loans are backed by the VA for eligible active-duty and veteran military service members and their spouses. These loans don’t require a down payment, but some borrowers may pay a funding fee. VA loans are offered through private lenders, and come with a cap on lender fees to keep borrowing costs affordable.

USDA loans help moderate- to low-income borrowers buy homes in rural areas. You must purchase a home in a USDA-eligible area and meet certain income limits to qualify. Some USDA loans do not require a down payment for eligible borrowers with low incomes.

12. Be Mindful of All Costs of Home-ownership

If you had sticker shock from seeing your new monthly principal and interest payment, wait until you add up the other costs of owning a home. As a new homeowner, you’ll pay for property taxes, mortgage insurance, homeowners insurance, hazard insurance, repairs, maintenance and utilities, to name a few.

A Bankrate.com survey found that the average homeowner pays $2,000 annually on maintenance services. Not having enough cushion in your monthly budget — or a healthy rainy day fund — can quickly put you in the red if you’re not prepared.

What to do instead: Your agent or lender can help you crunch numbers on taxes, mortgage insurance and utility bills. Shop around for insurance coverage to get compare quotes. Finally, aim to set aside at least 1 percent to 3 percent of the home’s purchase price annually for repairs and maintenance expenses.

13. Take Advantage of “Gift” Money

Many loan programs allow you to use a gift from a family, friend, employer or charity toward your down payment. Not sorting who will provide this money and when, though, can throw a wrench into a loan approval.

“The time to confirm that the Bank of Mom and Dad is ready, willing and able to provide you with help for your down payment is before you start home shopping,” says Dana Scanlon, a realtor with Keller Williams Capital Properties in Bethesda, Maryland. “If a buyer ratifies a contract to purchase a home with an understanding that they will be getting gift money, and the gift money fails to materialize, they can lose their earnest money deposit.”

What to do instead: Have a frank discussion with anyone who offers money as a gift toward your down payment about how much they are offering and when you’ll receive the money. Make a copy of the check or electronic transfer showing how and when the money traded hands from the gift donor to you. Lenders will verify this through bank statements and a signed gift letter.

Credit:  Bankrate.com

Adaptive Reuse at it’s Very Finest

Check out B1M’s Essay to see how Architects are reinventing older disused structures.

In an effort to retain heritage, reduce waste and overcome the challenge of finding sites in urban areas, architects, engineers and developers are breathing new life into existing structures and the communities around them.

From historic grain silos that are now museums to congested elevated roadways that have evolved into calming green parks, these are some of the greatest examples of reinvented structures.

THE FRØSILO – DENMARK
The ongoing revival of Copenhagen’s industrial waterfront has seen a number of existing structures re-purposed to serve the city’s growing demand for apartment living.


Above: The former industrial silos on Copenhagen’s waterfront have become apartments

The most impressive of these is undoubtedly Frøsilo, the adaptation of two silos formerly used by a soybean processing plant into a single unified structure that features 84 apartments.

Balancing their desire for waterfront views with the need to minimise penetrations in the silo and preserve the integrity of its superstructure, architects and engineers hung apartments from the exterior of the silo structures.

This approach enabled the silo interiors to be remodelled as full height lobbies, creating open and naturally lit atria for residents.

SEOULLO 7017 – SOUTH KOREA
Following in the footsteps of Paris’ Promenade Plantée and New York City’s High Line, Seoullo 7017 – widely known as the Seoul Sky Garden – adapts disused transport infrastructure to deliver much needed green space within densely a developed urban area.


Above: Once highway off-ramps, Seoullo now provides the residents of Seoul with much needed green space.

With a number of elevated highways being decommissioned, city planners elected to repurpose some overpasses for pedestrian use, improving connections while providing much-needed green space.

Opening in 2017, the Sky Garden runs adjacent to Seoul Station and now consists of more than 24,000 individual trees, plants and shrubs along its kilometre route through the city.

Standing 17 metres above its surroundings, a number of bridges and staircases have been installed to link the structure with surrounding shops, hotels and neighbourhoods.

ZEITZ MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART AFRICA – SOUTH AFRICA
First constructed in 1921, the grain silo on Cape Town’s waterfront stood as the tallest building in sub-Saharan Africa for over half a century.


Above: The cathedral-like interior of the former Cape Town silo

Now, the structure’s interior has been impressively carved open, to create one of the continent’s leading contemporary art museums.

While the building’s exterior remained largely unchanged, internally some 73% of the concrete silos within the structure’s storage annexe were demolished, while much of the 58-metre elevator tower’s interior was removed.
These adaptations created space for numerous gallery spaces along with a luxury hotel, restaurant and rooftop sculpture garden.

At the museum’s core, a number of the remaining silos have been retained but carved away to create a breath-taking cathedral-like atrium, that stretches up 27 metres through the building.

Nodding to the structure’s heritage, the ovoid form of this space mirrors that of a grain of corn, that was digitally scanned at the design stage to inform the plans.

OPTIMO HEADQUARTERS – UNITED STATES
Outgrowing their original premises, bespoke hat-maker Optimo converted the City of Chicago’s historic Firehouse in 2018, consolidating all aspects of their design and production operations into a single building.


Above: This century-old firehouse in Chicago is now the factory and headquarters for a hat maker

Shunning the idea of a new build industrial facility and instead, making use of the century-old building, Optimo selected the site for its location, reaffirming their commitment to the local community.

The ground level now serves as a factory, while the first floor has been refurbished to house offices and design studios.

Despite these adaptations, many of the building’s original features have been retained. Openings in the floor where fire poles once stood are now portholes offering views into the factory, while marble from the original firehouse has been repurposed in the kitchens.

LIBRARY, MUSEUM AND COMMUNITY CENTRE – NETHERLANDS
Built inside a historic church dating back to 1884, this library, museum and community centre has become a vibrant part of the city of Vught in the Netherlands.


Above and Below: The exterior and interior transformation of a historic church in the Netherlands

Opened in mid-2018, the conversion has already garnered significant acclaim for its impressive, multifunctional use of the internal space, that remains respectful to the structure’s original design and purpose.

While much of the church itself has been preserved in its original form, modern additions, both internally and externally have added new layers to the building.

External pavilions provide new space for shops and restaurants while a new internal mezzanine floor creates unique spaces within the church for studying and community use.

Many of the library’s bookcases are fitted on tracks, allowing them to be moved aside to create an open multi-use space in the heart of the church.

FONDAZIONE PRADA – ITALY
Completed in 2015, the conversion of this disused gin distillery in Milan created an exhibition, gallery and event space for the Fondazione Prada; an institution dedicated to contemporary art and culture.


Above: The distinctive gold-leaf tower at the Fondazione Prada in Milan

Consisting of several existing buildings and three new structures, the converted distillery now provides more than 19,000 square metres of space around a central courtyard.

While appearing relatively modest from the exterior, the facility is easily identifiable by its striking four-storey tower clad in 24-carat gold leaf.

Discover how New York’s iconic Woolworth Building was reinvented in B1M Documentary

Credit: The B1M, Photos belong to originators

Millennials Paid Record High Rents in 2018. Buy Instead! Says This Millionaire!

According to Housingwire.com in 2018 Mellinals were paying all time high rental rates. Here’s what David Bach has to say to them.

If you’re not prioritizing home ownership, you’re making a costly mistake, says co-founder of AE Wealth Management, bestselling author and self-made millionaire David Bach.

In fact, not buying a home is the single biggest mistake millennials are making, he tells CNBC Make It: “The most important advice I can tell you right now if you’re young is: Don’t listen to these people that tell you should rent versus buy.”

Even with the tax law changes, he notes, “buying a home is the escalator to wealth in America. Homeowners are worth forty times more than renters.”

You have to live somewhere for the rest of your life, Bach points out, so you might as well invest in a home that you could own permanently.

He crunches the numbers in his bestselling book, “The Automatic Millionaire”: “As a renter, you can easily spend half a million dollars or more on rent over the years ($1,500 a month for 30 years comes to $540,000), and in the end wind up just where you started — owning nothing.

“Or you can buy a house and spend the same amount paying down a mortgage, and in the end wind up owning your own home free and clear!”

“Let’s be honest: Renters make landlords rich,” Bach tells CNBC Make It. “I want you to make yourself rich, so start by saving money for a down payment now.”

He recommends having a down payment of at least 10 percent, though 20 percent is ideal. The easiest way to reach that amount is to have money automatically taken out of your paycheck or checking account on a regular basis and moved directly into a savings account earmarked specifically for your first home.

Buying that first home probably means you’re not buying your dream home, Bach says, but the way you reach that goal eventually is by prioritizing homeownership now.

“The way you build financial security is through real estate, and it starts by buying your first home,” he tells CNBC Make It.

(credit: cnbc.com)

Contact Us Today to learn about Affordable Financing Options. Many Financing Options are Available.

info@CompeteRealEstate.com | @CompeteRealEstate

Housing Forecast for 2019

What’s in store for Housing Prices, Flipping, Mortgage Rates? Diane Olick discusses the possible reason for decreasing home values, Ryan O’Hara (CEO Realtor.com) talks about hos flipping homes is turning into a difficult way to make money.

On The Money with Becky Quick

Moving to Mar Vista, CA (Palms)


Getting to Know Mar Vista, California USA

Mar Vista, a family friendly neighborhood good schools and a lots to do for kids and families. Located just east of the “pricey” Venice Neighborhood, Mar Vista offers all the convenience and access to beach communities, with a much more affordable price point.. Mar Vista has a great “small town” feel with lots of “mom & pop” cafes, boutiques, and services. This is a great place for young families working on west side or Hollywood, with great access to freeways, close to silicon beach tech companies, and quick access to Hollywood.
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Looking for a home in Mar Vista California, Give us a call, DM or message.
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Moving to Venice Beach, CA

Getting to Know Venice Beach, California USA

Young, Eclectic, Chic, Tech Center, Fashion, Surf, Beaches, Fitness, Fun. With everything from Modern New Build Homes & Condos to Vintage Craftsman Bungalows Venice has something for everyone.  If you are looking for a home in the Venice area, give us a call we know the area well and we can help.

The spirit of “Bohemian Style” turned “Boho Chic” in the heart of a beach town. If art is life, then life is the art of capturing experience. Venice calls to the artist in all of us, inviting individuals to shed the normal and reach for the new, raw and eclectic. From soaking up the beautiful Bay views across sprawling sand beaches to shopping for treasures among Beat generation artists and poets, we invite you to explore, experience and enjoy the ways Venice speaks to your soul.

Culture | To get a true taste of Venice, spend the day mixing and mingling with the people who breathe life into the city…the artists! Whether poetry or painting is your preferred medium, you’ll find artistic expression brought to life in both the physical and spiritual form. Grab a light lunch at a boardwalk café while listening to live street performer music, then ask a Beatnik-inspired barrista to lay a few lines on you while she makes you a latte. You’ll walk away from your visit with fabulous finds and memories to bring you back to the Venice beach-life time and again.

Entertainment | Whether you’re looking for a top-shelf tequila tasting or a dream tattoo, Venice has it all. Visit the free-spirited Venice Boardwalk to treasure-hunt it’s funky shops or vibe with the colorful street performers and public art murals. Abbott Kinney Boulevard, named after the city’s Tobacco millionaire founder, features foodie-fabulous hot spots, stylish boutiques and coffee bars. For the young at heart, there’s also a skate park and the famous Muscle Beach outdoor gym for ultimate sports or extreme people-watching.

Dining In Venice Beach | Full immersion into the culture of a city often starts with hunger, and Venice offers an array of gastronomical adventure to amaze the senses. Whatever your favorite cuisine, you’ll find it reflects the flair and nonconformity that makes up Venice’s culture of adventure. From five-star Mexican and Asian-fusion fare to mind-blowing all-day breakfasts and gourmet ice cream, there’s something for every type of foodie.

Shopping | Whether you desire a souvenir or a new addition to your art collection, Venice has it. From the offbeat offerings of its Indie shops and local labels to its fashionista-worthy international imports, Venice is a true destination for the retail savvy. Don’t miss Abbot Kinney’s charming boutiques or the Saturday Bazaar at Westminster Elementary school featuring more than 100 vintage vendors and artists.
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Looking for a home in Venice California, Give us a call, DM or message.
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Video Credit: HD Bros